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RUN FOR THE FUTURE IS BACK

20 July 2014

Help save men's lives

Bristol Rovers are proud to support the annual Run for the Future, which will take place once again on Bristol’s Downs this year, helping to save the lives of Bristol men.

The 5k fun run is being backed by TV personality Noel Edmonds and will raise much needed funds for the Bristol Urological Institute Prostate Cancer Appeal based at Southmead Hospital when it takes place on Sunday September 14th.

Since the first run nine years ago over £250,000 has been raised to support the research and treatment of prostate cancer in Bristol.

Noel Edmonds said: “Prostate cancer has the same fatality rates as breast cancer but we don’t hear so much about it. Us men are a bit rubbish at getting ourselves checked out and going to the doctors but it is so important that we take notice of this deadly disease.

“Having personally known people who have been affected by prostate cancer I’m urging people to sign up to Run For the Future; not only is it going to be a fun day out, the best bit is all the money raised stays in Bristol to help people in our local area.”

Prostate cancer is known as the ‘silent killer’ and claims the lives of 11,000 men every year in the UK with a further 41,000 being diagnosed. 

Run for the Future is a 5-kilometre family fun-run on the Downs. The event is open to all ages and abilities and participants can either walk, run or jog around the course.

There will also be stalls and local bands playing before the run to provide entertainment and refreshments and families and supporters will be able to join in and cheer on their runners, while enjoying the great atmosphere.

Organised by Bristol Rotarians, Run for the Future has raised over a quarter of a million pounds in the past nine years, which has gone towards funding treatment and research at Southmead Hospital as well as groundbreaking research in collaboration with Bristol University and University of the West of England.

Research includes ways of identifying aggressive forms of the cancer and developing technology of minimally invasive surgical instruments in prostate cancer treatment. The funding has also allowed the acquisition of equipment to detect and count cancer cells in blood samples which can allow treatments to be started earlier.  

Director of the Bristol Urological Institute and Consultant Urologist, Professor David Gillatt said: “Run for the Future has not only raised vital funding for prostate cancer research in Bristol but has also done a great job of raising awareness of this little talked about disease.”

People can register for this year’s event by going to www.runforthefuture.org.uk . More details of the event will be revealed over forthcoming weeks.


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